In Chennai, India’s largest panoramic mural created in solidarity with AIDS survivors

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The panoramic mural, titled ‘We Are’, spreads the message of shared humanity, of how folks struggling or having recovered from AIDS deserve equal rights and a spot in society.

St+art India Foundation, TANSACS, Tidel Park and Southern Railway have come together to create India’s largest mural titled ‘We Are’. The art work supported by Asian Paints, began in December last year; took approximately 40 days to complete and spans a vast 63,000 sq ft. It aims to de-stigmatise the HIV and AIDS affected community and empower them while sharing hopeful stories of survivors. | Photograph by Pranav Gohil.

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St+artwork India Basis, TANSACS, Tidel Park and Southern Railway have come collectively to create India’s largest mural titled ‘We Are’. The artwork work supported by Asian Paints, started in December final 12 months; took roughly 40 days to finish and spans an enormous 63,000 sq ft. It goals to de-stigmatise the HIV and AIDS affected group and empower them whereas sharing hopeful tales of survivors. | {Photograph} by Pranav Gohil.
India has the third largest HIV epidemic in the world. In 2017, HIV prevalence among adults (aged 15-49) was an estimated 0.2 percemt. This figure is small compared to most other middle-income countries but because of India's huge population (1.3 billion people) this equates to 2.1 million people living with HIV. Overall, this epidemic is slowing down. Between 2010 and 2017 new infections declined by 27 percent and AIDS-related deaths more than halved, falling by 56 percent. (Source: UNAIDS Data 2018) | Photograph by Pranav Gohil.

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India has the third largest HIV epidemic on the planet. In 2017, HIV prevalence amongst adults (aged 15-49) was an estimated 0.2 percemt. This determine is small in comparison with most different middle-income nations however due to India’s enormous inhabitants (1.3 billion folks) this equates to 2.1 million folks dwelling with HIV. General, this epidemic is slowing down. Between 2010 and 2017 new infections declined by 27 % and AIDS-related deaths greater than halved, falling by 56 %. (Supply: UNAIDS Knowledge 2018) | {Photograph} by Pranav Gohil.
The panoramic mural, titled ‘We Are’, spreads the message of shared humanity, of how people suffering or having recovered from AIDS deserve equal rights and a place in society. The mural drives this message home by mixing portraits of AIDS patients with those who don't, showing how we are all human, and the same. | Photograph by Pranav Gohil.

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The panoramic mural, titled ‘We Are’, spreads the message of shared humanity, of how folks struggling or having recovered from AIDS deserve equal rights and a spot in society. The mural drives this message dwelling by mixing portraits of AIDS sufferers with those that do not, displaying how we’re all human, and the identical. | {Photograph} by Pranav Gohil.
The mural is designed by Chennai-based graffiti writer and street artist A-Kill, along with Delhi-based Khatra. A-Kill, whose work is inspired by visuals offered by the streets and everyday life, is renowned for his skilled hand in portraiture, and his special connect with Chennai is reflected in this mural. This month-long project will be unveiled at Chennai’s Indira Nagar Railway Station. | Photograph by Pranav Gohil.

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The mural is designed by Chennai-based graffiti author and road artist A-Kill, together with Delhi-based Khatra. A-Kill, whose work is impressed by visuals supplied by the streets and on a regular basis life, is famend for his expert hand in portraiture, and his particular join with Chennai is mirrored on this mural. This month-long venture might be unveiled at Chennai’s Indira Nagar Railway Station. | {Photograph} by Pranav Gohil.
The length of the Indira Nagar railway platform is 280 metres. Seen running through the station facade is the red ribbon — recognised symbol of AIDS awareness, and whose vivid red hue represents ideas of love and passion. The continuous flow of this powerful emblem across the station changes its landscape, emphasises the notion of community and collective responsibility and cements the station as a landmark of Chennai’s inclusive spirit. | Photograph by Pranav Gohil.

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The size of the Indira Nagar railway platform is 280 metres. Seen working by way of the station facade is the crimson ribbon — recognised image of AIDS consciousness, and whose vivid crimson hue represents concepts of affection and keenness. The continual circulate of this highly effective emblem throughout the station modifications its panorama, emphasises the notion of group and collective duty and cements the station as a landmark of Chennai’s inclusive spirit. | {Photograph} by Pranav Gohil.
The underlying aim is to highlight art as an effective response to global crises, and a tool to deliver messages of awareness, feelings of longing or loss and ideas of hope. The mural depicts the portraits of five individuals, of which three are patients of HIV, but which cannot be determined by just visual appearances.| Photograph by Pranav Gohil.

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The underlying intention is to focus on artwork as an efficient response to world crises, and a software to ship messages of consciousness, emotions of longing or loss and concepts of hope. The mural depicts the portraits of 5 people, of which three are sufferers of HIV, however which can’t be decided by simply visible appearances.| {Photograph} by Pranav Gohil.
COVID-19 has demonstrated that, during a pandemic, no one is safe until everyone is safe. Leaving people behind is not an option if we are to succeed. With this ideology in mind, this mural reflects the theme of this year’s World AIDS Day, as declared by UNAIDS: “Global solidarity, shared responsibility”. Portraying several diverse yet familiar faces, the artwork celebrates these unique identities while reinforcing the notion that there are no physical determinants to AIDS.| Photograph by Pranav Gohil.

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COVID-19 has demonstrated that, throughout a pandemic, nobody is secure till everyone seems to be secure. Leaving folks behind is just not an possibility if we’re to succeed. With this ideology in thoughts, this mural displays the theme of this 12 months’s World AIDS Day, as declared by UNAIDS: “World solidarity, shared duty”. Portraying a number of various but acquainted faces, the paintings celebrates these distinctive identities whereas reinforcing the notion that there are not any bodily determinants to AIDS.| {Photograph} by Pranav Gohil.

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